Third Grade Robots

Third grade artists created these fun robots by tracing around some interesting objects.  They were surprised to learn that outlet plug covers and old watercolor trays could be used as stencils – especially fine for creating robot parts!

They focused on the art elements of line, shape, and color to finish up their “bots”.

Visit Georgetown’s Artsonia On-Line Art Museum to see more amazing robots! ARTSONIA

From the GTown Art Room…

It’s been a busy first couple of weeks in our Georgetown art room!  Here’s a look at what we’ve done in the last 9 days since school began.

img_0961 We did this!

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Quarter circles – we put them together to make some fancy circles.

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We talked about three big Art Elements and read an awesome book – because we are all MAGNIFICENT artists!

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Kinders and Firsties drew their favorite things and made table tags to help Mrs. B. learn ALL their names!  Yikes, I have lots of leaning to do.

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Fourth and Fifth graders put new pages in their sketchbooks and did some drawing.

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Third graders described warm and cool colors and began a new watercolor project.

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Second graders began torn paper masks (mean Mrs. Brouwer took their scissors away and ugh, they had to TEAR the paper!).  No Glue Monsters allowed for this project!

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Kinders met Mr. Mondrian and practiced their cutting skills to create their own Mondrian Broadway Boogie Woogies.

And Firsties began a cool Picasso project….but I was too busy to take pictures – more later.

Whew!  And that is just the first nine days folks!

 

Art Review Time

We’ve been doing a little fun review of art elements and concepts as third and fourth graders wrap up their final projects.

Third graders divided their paper into triangles using masking tape, drew patterns with crayons, and painted with watercolors.  They finished up by gently peeling away the masking tape, brainstorming everything they could remember about art with their friends, and writing about art in the taped spaces.

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It was such fun to read these pieces!

Fourth grade artists created realistic drawings of their hands (ok, I let them trace their hands, but the details including rings, fingernails, and shading were a big challenge!)  They drew and illustrated the art elements and attached them to a wristband…fun!

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Galler Houses

Third Grade artists have been working on a colorful architecture project in the style of American folk artist Heather Galler.  They learned that Galler is inspired by the things she loves, including animals, flowers, and houses.  After examining Galler’s house paintings from the New Orleans French Quarter and noticing the many details on these beautiful homes, they created their own “double gallery” New Orleans houses.

9e98a21d67fe3a8e6085484131623338 New Orleans House by Galler

Georgetown Galler inspired houses – aren’t they fabulous?

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See more of our 3rd Grade Galler Houses at our ARTSONIA on line art gallery here.

I CAN:  tell a friend three facts about New York folk artist Heather Galler; create an architectural house drawing in the style of Galler; Use color, line, shape, and pattern in my work.

 

 

 

 

Gyotaku Fish Prints

Eeew – fish prints?!  My third grade artists were a little bit worried when I began telling them about Japanese fish printing!  Gyotaku (Japanese 魚拓, from gyo “fish” + taku “rubbing”) is the traditional Japanese method of printing fish, a practice that dates back to the mid-1800s. This form of nature printing may have been used by fishermen to record their catches, but has also become an art form of its own.

We watched this video about Gyotaku, and – the printing began – with rubber fish, of course!

Third graders painted their fish with printing ink and carefully placed paper on top, rubbing the paper to transfer the fish design to the paper.  It was tricky to figure out how much ink to use, but after trial and error, they created some beautiful fish prints!

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After carefully cutting out the prints, third graders glued them to their beautiful Shibori paper backgrounds.  Find out more about our Shibori project here.

Here are some of their fabulous gyotaku pieces.

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Visit our ARTSONIA on-line art gallery to see more gyotaku prints!

I Can Goals: *tell a friend what gyotaku means; successfully print three fish; mindfully cut and attach fish to a shibori background; explain the shibori paper dyeing process

Third Grade and The Rule of Thirds

Third grade artists learned a new “artist trick” to make their artwork more interesting and visually pleasing – the Rule of Thirds.  (Shhh…they also worked with fractions, but don’t tell them!)

Students learned that the human eye naturally gravitates to certain intersection points when an image is divided into thirds.  Placing objects on these points creates a stronger and more visually interesting work of art.

They watched this neat little video to help them understand the concept:

They also looked at works of art and figured out how the artists used the Rule of Thirds in their work.

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Third graders were challenged to create a composition using the Rule of Thirds…and to sweeten the project, they drew Valentine candy.  It was tricky at first…but their completed compositions were – sweet, of course!

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I CAN: explain the Rule of Thirds to a friend; create a composition using the Rule of Thirds.

George Meets Jackson

Third grade artists have been creating artwork inspired by two artists – George Rodrigue and “Action Jackson” Pollock.

First they drew dogs in the style of well-known Louisiana “Blue Dog” artist, George Rodrigue.

George Rodrigue Blue dog

Next they did some spatter paintings like abstract artist Jackson Pollock.  Getting messy and printing with paint drippy string is an all time favorite for third grade – it never gets old!

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We put everything together and painted a black swirly frame.  Ooh-la-la, beautiful art is made when George meets Jackson!

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I Can:

Identify the work of George Rodrigue and Jackson Pollock; Explain what abstract art is; Create art in the style of Rodrigue and Pollock

Scientific Drawings

Thinking about a new career?  Georgetown third grade artists learned all about becoming a scientific illustrator.  They discovered that a scientific drawing is a detailed, accurate drawing that can be used to illustrate a textbook or to help study a plant or animal. They enjoyed studying leaves, feathers, pinecones, and other objects from nature as they created these beautiful and accurate drawings.

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For a final fun step, third graders painted and printed leaves for a pop of color.  We have some future scientific illustrators who will be looking for a job soon!

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I Can Goals:

* I can make observations and detailed drawings of natural objects

* I can create an eye path and movement with thoughtful placement of drawings on my paper

Quick! Tell Three Facts About Leonardo daVinci!

Do you know three interesting facts about Leonardo daVinci?  I’ll bet a Georgetown third grade artist can help you out!  They recently learned all about the great artist daVinci; not only did he paint the famous Mona Lisa, but he was a sculptor, inventor, musician, and mathematician.  Students examined a Mona Lisa print and discovered how daVinci was able to draw her eyes so that she seems to follow you across the room.

Third grade artists created their own Mona Lisa portraits, surrounding their portraits with drawings of inventions and notes just as Leonardo daVinci might have done.

One of my favorite parts of this project are the detailed inventions and notes!

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See more Mona Lisa portraits at our on-line gallery ARTSONIA!

I CAN Goals:

I can tell three facts about Leonardo daVinci.

I can draw a realistic portrait of the Mona Lisa.

I can show how to draw the famous Mona Lisa eyes.