Kindergarten Chickens

Kindergarten artists had fun drawing and coloring these bright chickens. The artists learned they could use simple shapes to create their chickens. They started by tracing a circle for the head. They drew triangles and ovals for the beaks and feathers. A rectangle or square was used for the box,  a circle for the sun, and ovals for the eggs.

In the Kindergarten art room we like to explore all different mediums throughout the year. This project introduced them to oil pastels. The artists founds out they were very messy, but created bright colors. Messy fingers usually make for a fun day in art class!

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Here are just a few of our masterpieces!

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Learning Goals

*I can draw common objects using simple shapes.

*I can carefully use oil pastels.

Kindergarten Peacocks

There are flocks of peacocks popping up in the Kindergarten hallway! The Kindergarten artists created these amazing peacocks after studying the artist Eric Carle. They discovered that Eric Carle wrote and illustrated many of their favorite picture books. After a fun and messy session of painting papers, the students cut their papers to create their peacocks.

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Learning goals:

I can identify the art of Eric Carle

I can use warm and cool colors to create a peacock

Kindergarten Paul Klee Cats

The Kindergarten artists have been busy learning about the Swiss painter, Paul Klee. Paul Klee’s paintings were very childlike with bright colors like the color he saw when he visited Africa.

IMG_2428                                        His famous painting entitled Cat and Bird was the inspiration for this project.

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After drawing their cat and bird, Kindergarteners chose bright watercolors to add color. They finished their paintings by using a very small paintbrush to outline their lines with black paint. Awesome job Kindergarteners! You have really brightened our hallways at Georgetown.

We’ve Been Busy!

Check out all the gorgeous winter-themed art we’ve been creating!

IMG_4859 IMG_4845 5th Grade Pines

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4th Grade Polka Dot Poinsettias

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3rd Grade Winter Pines

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2nd Grade Winter Owls

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1st Grade Cardinals

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Kindergarten Winter Shapes

Parents – you can find more winter art, along with your child’s entire gallery of artwork at our on-line gallery ARTSONIA.

Kindergarten Winter Shapes

IMG_1794Kindergarten artists have been busy cutting and gluing shapes to create these beautiful winter scenes. After painting the background sky, the artists cut common shapes to build trees and houses. These projects have brightened up our hallways on our gloomy December days.IMG_1671IMG_1666IMG_1668IMG_1746IMG_1738IMG_1793

See more of these Kindergarten Winter Shapes at our ARTSONIA site!

 

Kindergarten Secondary Pumpkins

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Kindergarten artists are learning about Primary and Secondary colors. Students were given play dough in Primary colors and found out that Primary colors can mix together to form new colors we call Secondary colors. Students then drew pumpkins on paper and were given paint in Primary colors. They mixed the yellow and red paint on the paper to make orange for their pumpkins. They mixed yellow and blue on their paper to make green for their leaves. After the pumpkins dried, they cut them out and glued them on purple paper. All three secondary colors are represented on their final project; orange, green and purple. Way to go Kindergarteners! Your pumpkins turned out great.

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See more cute pumpkins at our ARTSONIA Art Gallery!

 

Kindergarten Mini Mondrians

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At Hudsonville Public Schools, each elementary grade has at least three artists they are required to be introduced to. Kindergarten students learn about the Dutch artist Piet Mondrian. Mondrian is such a great artist for Kindergarteners to learn about because he painted with Primary colors and straight lines. He really liked horizontal and vertical lines. Kindergarteners at Georgetown Elementary created “Mini Mondrians” by using small squares of paper and gluing on strips of Primary colored construction paper. They glued four mini squares onto their large black square to create their project. Students were allowed to make an extra mini square to take home to show their family.

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See more Mini Mondrians at our ARTSONIA on-line Art Gallery!

Kindergarten Line Fish

IMG_1302Kindergarten students began the year learning about the art element, Line. They learned what a line was and that they use different kinds of lines every day. They were allowed to explore drawing different kinds of lines. After hearing the story Only One You by Linda Kranz, each student created their own fish and decorated it with thick, thin, curvy, straight, etc. lines to make their fish unique. They finished their fish by adding lines of tissue paper for the tail and fins. They did an amazing job and the fish look so bright and colorful in our hallways!
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See more of our Kindergarten fish project at our on-line art gallery, Artsonia!

 

Kindergarten Snails

Kindergarten artists worked with Model Magic to create these wonderful snails. The artists had so much fun coloring their white model magic with markers before creating their snails. Students learned how to knead the marker color into their clay to create bright colors. They also worked on rolling the clay into a ball and creating a coil to make the shell of the snail.

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The snails looked beautiful displayed in the glass cases at school. Great job Kindergarten artists!

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Kindergarten Self-Portraits

Kindergarten artists created these special self-portraits to give their moms for Mother’s Day. The artists learned that a self-portrait is a drawing or painting of themselves. I love the innocence of Kindergarten drawings, and knew their moms would love their drawings too.  I struggled with directing the students too much so all the portraits looked the same, but directing them enough so they would have success with their portraits. I decided to take the students through an exercise of exploring their faces and bodies so they did not miss any parts. We pulled our shoulders up to see what we would look like if we didn’t have a neck and they thought that would look pretty silly! We also discovered that our eyes are in the middle of our heads, not our noses. After exploring their bodies, students eagerly began drawing their portraits while adding their own unique touches. After the portraits were finished and the tissue paper backgrounds were added, their classroom teachers helped them write notes and Mother’s Day wishes to their moms around the border. IMG_5870IMG_5869IMG_5868IMG_5874 .IMG_5873IMG_5871IMG_5759

This project meets the following Michigan Visual Arts Standards:

Explore the elements of art through playful sensory experiences.

Recognize that art can be created for self expression or fun.

This project can be found on our online art gallery ARTSONIA