A Look Back…and Forward

Hi all…here’s a look back at some fun projects that I didn’t get a chance to share with you this past fall.

Kindergarten Mr. Mondrians!

Giant Georgetown Turkey.  Gobble Gobble.

 Kinders – puttin’ a little glaze on their clay tree ornaments.

Fourth Grade Calder sculptures

What’s coming up in 2017?  Grades 2-5 are really, really, really excited to start their clay projects when we return from break.  Kinders and Firsties will be learning about color and doing some interesting color experiments and projects.  And everyone will be exploring this year’s Cultural Focus: Africa.

In the meantime….

See you soon!

Fifth Grade Chancay Figures

Fifth Grade artists learned about the ancient kingdom of Chancay, a Pre-Columbian civilization located along the coast of Peru.  Our artists created model magic figurines that were inspired by the ceramics made by the Chancay people.

150px-Idolo_Cultura_Chancay Clay idol from the Chancay culture.

IMG_2777 They began with “thumbnail” sketches in their sketchbooks.

IMG_2768 Creating the background – a bit of recycle art with cardboard and some awesome texture made from a donation of window shade samples.

IMG_2765 IMG_2766 IMG_2767 IMG_2774Creating and painting the Chancay figures using Model Magic.  Students recalled our earlier color unit and talked about Earth tones and neutral colors.

IMG_2792 IMG_2793 IMG_2794 IMG_2795Finished pieces.  Aren’t they wonderful?

Michigan Visual Arts Standards: 

Compare and contrast works of art as belonging to
particular cultures, times, and places.  

Demonstrate how history, culture, and the visual arts
interrelate in making and studying works of art.


New Zealand Korus

What’s a Koru?  Ask a Georgetown second grade artist!  They will explain that a Koru is a New Zealand Maori word that means “loop”.  A koru looks like a fern frond or a spiral, and to the New Zealand Maori people the koru represents life, growth, strength, and peace.

Second grade artists drew these beautiful korus with a marker and finished them with carefully blended oil pastels.

 blending the koru with a paper tortillion.


Special thanks to the fourth graders at Alum Creek  Elementary School in Ohio for this project inspiration!