Kindergarten Line Monsters


IMG_5724Kindergarteners at Georgetown have been busy learning about lines in the art room. After reading the book, Lines that Wiggle, by Candace Whitman, they explored all different kinds of lines. They began by drawing lines in the air with their imaginary pencils, then they painted them on paper with black tempera paint. When those lines dried they used watercolor paints to paint color between their lines. The final step was to cut them to look like monsters by adding eyes, (or an eye), mouths, teeth, and other things to make their monsters unique. The Kindergarten artists had so much fun creating their monsters and they are proud to display them in the halls at Georgetown!

This was a great first lesson for Kindergarten. It took a few sessions, but we were able to learn many first skills in the art room. We learned how to use scissors properly by holding our thumbs up and moving the paper, not the scissors. We learned painting correctly by treating the paintbrush like a ballerina and tiptoeing in our paint and dancing across our paper. We also learned how to properly use a glue stick by making the glue peek over the edge and not pop over the edge. Best of all, we were able to learn the routine of painting and cleaning up paint in the art room by starting simple with just one color.






A Shout-Out to Our Art Room Volunteers!

What a great school year it has been!  Mrs. Persch and I couldn’t have survived without the fabulous help of some special volunteers.  A HUGE thank you to Lisa Vredevoogd and her sweet daughter Mya for hanging artwork, taking art work down, hanging MORE artwork…you get the picture.  We so appreciate that you help us beautify our hallways with our student masterpieces.

Another giant thank you to Amy Sremba for taking thousands (yes, thousands!) of photos of student artwork to upload to our online Artsonia Student Art Gallery.  Thanks to Amy, we have 3,812 student works of art on display in our gallery for the 2014-2015 school year…and a grand total of 10,423 art pieces uploaded since 2010!  Check out our gallery here!

We can’t thank you all enough…hope you enjoy the little owl pins I felted for you…and please come back in the fall for more fun!


Hoot! We love you!


Kindergarten Paul Klee Cats

The Kindergarten artists have been busy learning about the Swiss painter, Paul Klee. Paul Klee’s paintings were very childlike with bright colors like the color he saw when he visited Africa.

IMG_2428                                        His famous painting entitled Cat and Bird was the inspiration for this project.


After drawing their cat and bird, Kindergarteners chose bright watercolors to add color. They finished their paintings by using a very small paintbrush to outline their lines with black paint. Awesome job Kindergarteners! You have really brightened our hallways at Georgetown.

Ketchup Time!

Georgetown’s fifth grade artists are completing two different art pieces this week.  We’ve gotten a little behind due to snow days and winter break, so we’ve been playing “Catch Up”…or as we say in the art room, Ketchup Time!


These fun and colorful villages are inspired by the work of Austrian architect and artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

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Take a peek at this fun video to see Hundertwasser’s work….my 5th graders are still asking to watch the video, but I suspect it is partly because of the music that goes along with it!

Fifth graders have also been getting a kick out of their Salvadore Dali “Vase or Face” pieces.  Which is it…vase or face?

Facevase  This famous optical illusion became the basis for their own surreal vase/face pieces, complete with symbols often used by Salvador Dali himself – ants, eyes, and floating watches.  It has been fun to see how my students interpret the Surrealist art movement and integrate the dreamlike, slightly uncomfortable images of Surrealism into their own pieces.

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See more Hundertwasser and Vase/Face pieces at our ARTSONIA online art gallery!

Learning Goals:  *Identify the work of Hundertwasser and Dali *Name two facts about both artists *Create an architectural drawing in the style of Hundertwasser *Identify elements of Surrealism including transformation and juxtaposition  *Create a Surreal drawing in the style of Dali


Picasso Portraits

First Grade artists have been exploring the abstract work of Spanish artist Pablo Picasso.  They learned that Picasso worked in a style called Cubism.  After looking at lots of cubist art pieces, our smart first graders decided that cubism is when an artist uses lots of shapes and shows details from different views in the same picture – like their practice drawings here:

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Next they discovered that when Picasso was sad, he used lots of blue paint during his “Blue Period”.  Picasso’s work changed when he became happier and he used more oranges and pinks during his “Rose Period”.

They chose their own blue or rose color period to create their Picasso portrait collages.  See more of our awesome Picassos at our Artsonia on-line gallery!


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Learning Goals:

I can tell two facts about Pablo Picasso; I can explain cubism; I can create a portrait in the cubist style of Pablo Picasso

Kindergarten Winter Shapes

IMG_1794Kindergarten artists have been busy cutting and gluing shapes to create these beautiful winter scenes. After painting the background sky, the artists cut common shapes to build trees and houses. These projects have brightened up our hallways on our gloomy December days.IMG_1671IMG_1666IMG_1668IMG_1746IMG_1738IMG_1793

See more of these Kindergarten Winter Shapes at our ARTSONIA site!


Looking For A Special Holiday Gift?

Check out our student artwork on Artsonia, our on-line art gallery!  We are busy uploading winter and holiday themed student artwork – perfect for a special holiday gift!  Your child’s  artwork can be printed on a variety of items – from mugs to holiday cards.  And…20% of your purchase goes directly to our Georgetown Art Department.

Here’s Sara14000’s poinsettia piece – visit our gallery for more gift ideas!


Fourth Grade Figure Studies

Georgetown Fourth Grade artists recently finished a huge figure drawing unit.  They began by looking at the art of Edgar Degas, who was a master at drawing the human figure and known for his pastel drawings of ballerinas.



Then they tried their own figure drawings…modeling for each other and doing a series of quick gesture drawings in their sketchbooks.


Next we moved on to drawing wooden mannequin figures!



Finally – they created a background by straw blowing paint and outlining their beautiful blotches…and adding their figure drawings and other practice forms on their background.  Magnificent!

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* Identify the work of Edgar Degas

* Capture movement in a figure by gesture drawing

* Draw a mannequin figure in correct proportion

See more 4th Grade figure drawings at our ARTSONIA on-line gallery!


2nd Grade Tigers


After learning about the life and art of Henri Rousseau, 2nd graders at Georgetown created these ferocious tigers in the style of Rousseau.  They learned that Rousseau liked to paint jungle scenes with wild animals even though he had never been to the jungle or had ever seen a wild animal. First the artists drew the tiger and painted it. Then they painted and cut out flowers and leaves to create a jungle scene. These tigers turned out great even though none of these artists had ever been to the jungle either!



See more of our ferocious tigers at our Artsonia On-Line Art Gallery!

There are lots of tiger projects out there on art blogs – we’d like to thank Alum Creek Elementary School’s Artsonia page for our project inspiration! See their page here.


Kindergarten Secondary Pumpkins


Kindergarten artists are learning about Primary and Secondary colors. Students were given play dough in Primary colors and found out that Primary colors can mix together to form new colors we call Secondary colors. Students then drew pumpkins on paper and were given paint in Primary colors. They mixed the yellow and red paint on the paper to make orange for their pumpkins. They mixed yellow and blue on their paper to make green for their leaves. After the pumpkins dried, they cut them out and glued them on purple paper. All three secondary colors are represented on their final project; orange, green and purple. Way to go Kindergarteners! Your pumpkins turned out great.



See more cute pumpkins at our ARTSONIA Art Gallery!